As you plan your timber frame home…

As you begin planning your timber frame home, you’ll have an idea what size, budget, and style home you want.  It helps to get that information on paper.  Your plan will include lots of details, but a good starting place is the worksheet we’ve created to help identify your ideas.

You’ll need to think about the size of each room and how it all fits together.  It’s easy to think we want a 2500 square foot house, but when we bring together the size and number of rooms we want or need, it often exceeds the space we thought we wanted. Looking at the information as a whole will help you to fine tune your plan before you start.

What space do you seldom use?  Could it become part of another room that is not used often?  What space is important and how do you use it?  Do you want more or less room than you live in now?  Keep in mind that the open floor plan of a timber frame “lives” larger than a conventionally built home.

So, take a little time and download our Timber Frame Home Worksheet .  Fill it out and live with it a little while.  Send it to us, if you’d like for our designer to review it with you.  If not, consider it a tool that will help you make some critical decisions.

It takes time and thought to plan a home that will live as well as you hope.  At Goshen Timber Frames, we’ve been known to work with our timber friends for years to get it right.  Don’t hurry and do live with your plan a while before you build.  It’s that important.

So, move on, begin that journey and when you build, Build Boldly!

 

 

Designing Your Timber Frame Home – Around a Special Piece

Designing your timber frame home can be a challenge, especially if you have a special piece that needs that perfect space. As long as you plan ahead, a long-loved treasure can be showcased in your new home. With some time and patience, the perfect design can be brought together.goshen timber frames - custom design

Goshen clients Dale and Susan worked closely with designer Bobby Johns to make sure that Dale’s theater organ was well placed.  It “lives” in a niche created by heavy timber posts, anchoring the living area.  Speakers are mounted behind sidewalls, out of the way, but perfect for the sounds from this wonderful piece.

Whether it’s a family antique, the perfect piece you found years ago and have moved from home to home, a great sculpture or painting,  or a new addition to your collection, it should have a special place in your new home.  Timbers can be carefully arranged to highlight the features you love best.  Wall heights can be easily adjusted to make room for that extra tall cabinet.

So, don’t leave it behind.  Make it shine in your new home.  Design it in and love it where it sits.  Build, and always Build Boldly!

 

 

 

 

Cost to Build a Timber Frame House

What does it cost to build a 2000 square foot timber frame house?   I guess there are two extreme answers…”not much” or “all you’ve got”.   And both are accurate answers to that question.

A timber frame doesn’t cost 20-30% more to build than any other custom home because the final number depends on so many other factors.  It may cost a little more, but those costs are offset by removing tray ceilings, crown molding, and other details that aren’t needed to make a timber frame special.

Houses, even timber frame homes, come in all different configurations.  Let’s consider some options:

Floor Space – That 2000 square feet can be divided into three floors (lower level, first floor, second floor/loft).  The 2000 square feet can become a variation of a rambling ranch.  The 2000 square feet can be on the first and second levels.

Roof Lines –  You can have a straight gable roof, a hipped roof, a roof with reverse gables and valleys, and everything else utilizing these “standard” roofs.

Timber – Timber can be green (most common), kiln-dried, air-dried.  It can be pine, douglas fir, oak, cedar.  It can even be reclaimed timber.

Site – Is it flat?  Is it steep?  Is it heavily wooded?  Is it rural and hard to get to?

Decks/Porches – Lots of decks and porches?  Enclosed?  Screened?

Fireplace(s) – One…more.  Masonry? Inserts? Rock, brick, or cultured stone?

Roofing – Asphalt shingles, cedar shakes, standing seam, metal?

You can see where I’m going here and we haven’t even touched on the interior appliances, fixtures, and finishes.  The possibilities to spend … and to save … money are endless.  At the end of the day, the cost of that 2000  square foot timber frame home will run between $300,000 and $800,000.  We’ve seen 2000 square foot homes built everywhere in that range.

Cost per square foot?  It’s smoke and mirrors.  Which square foot are you talking about?  The kitchen?  The entry?  The bedroom?  The real cost to build a timber frame house is calculated by the “cost to construct”.  It’s a real number reached by working as a team to identify all the components as closely as possible.  That team can start with you and your timber frame company’s design team and once preliminary drawings are in place, grow to include your contractor and any pertinent tradesmen.

So, next time someone tells you that you can build for X$ per square foot, ask them “which square foot?” and see what answer you get.  In the meantime, start your process to design and build your new timber frame home with an appropriate budget and work with people who have been through the process to develop plans that work with that budget.  You may not get everything you want…or you may get more.   But the cost to build your timber frame home will be much smoother as you work through the process.

The truth is, there is no easy, fill in the blank answer to the question…”What will it cost to build a timber frame house?”…, but there is an answer to what it will take to build YOUR timber frame home and that answer takes some work and investment on both your part and the part of your design/build team.

Give me a call at 828-524-8662 or drop me an email if I can help you plan your timber frame home, Bonnie Pickartz,  Goshen Timber Frames

 

 

 

4 Questions to Answer in Planning Timber Frame Homes

Planning green timber frame homes is, if anything, easier than planning to build a conventional home.  Timber frames and structural insulated panels take the project well into “green” territory before any other decision is made. Using minimally processed materials (heavy timbers) and an unsurpassed enclosure systems makes green building less stressful.

As you do plan your new timber frame home, you’ll need to consider if you want to build as green as possible, whether to seek green building certification, and where to concentrate your efforts. The possibilities are endless, as are the questions and the answers. If you consider these questions early on, you’ll have a big picture understanding and can make other decisions based on these answers.  Timber frame homes allow you to answer “yes” to these questions.

Energy efficiency,  durability, and renewability are key to evaluating any building system. And buildings are a system and should be planned as such. The answers will help you to determine your path to having a home that will serve you and generations well. Answering these questions for each component will give you the “greenest” home, but answering them for the timber frame package takes you a long way toward an energy efficient, sustainable home.colmar timber frame homes

  1. Does it have a long life? Timber frame homes that were built over a thousand years ago are in place and living well today.
  2. Does it save energy? Timber frames, enclosed in insulated panels are hard to beat. The reduced consumption of energy is good for your pocket and for the earth.
  3. Does it minimize contributions to the waste stream? Timbers are minimally processed. Panels are built offsite, minimizing site waste.
  4. Is it renewable and recyclable? Many timbers are grown as a crop. They are a naturally renewable resource and can easily be recycled. Today many barns built hundreds of years ago are being repurposed as homes, flooring, and other building materials.

Plan carefully, considering your site and how to best place your home, the size of your home (don’t over or under build), the materials you use to finish your home. Each step brings more questions, but these four questions will help you to gauge the sustainability of the materials your using.

And when you build, build for generations and…build boldly!

 

 

Energy Costs in Timber Frame Homes

Energy costs in timber frame homes has always been one of the items we bring to the table when we discuss the advantages of timber frames.  The cost to heat and cool a home that’s wrapped in structural insulated panels is typically low.   As we designed our home, we wanted plenty of natural light, but understand all too well that windows are the least efficient wall space.  However, our utility bills continue to please us.

We heat and cool our house with electricity.  Propane to cook and for the tankless water heater runs less than $100 a year.  In the past twelve months, our electricity has cost less than $886. While we watch our usage, we comfortable and don’t live in a dark, cold home.  Even with an abundance of windows, our costs average $2.41 per day for electricity.  Timber frame homes offer these economies naturally.Bonnie Pickartz Electric Costs in Timber Frame Homes

As we discuss designing homes with our clients, we consider daylighting, air flow, and overhangs to be an important part of the design process.  Homes shouldn’t only be beautiful, they should be comfortable and efficient.  We bring this altogether in the final design.

Energy costs will continue to rise, so it is always important to consider ways to make homes more efficient. This alone will minimize the money spent in the future to heat and cool a home.  Adding a well insulated envelope to the items on your wish list in your new home is the most effective way to save money long term.  Today we can’t stress the importance of this too much.  Save money…daily.

So, consider your options, and when you build…build boldly!

BonniePickartzSnow

 

 

Designing and Building Timber Frame Homes – Beginning the Journey

Even with cold temperatures daily, many thoughts are turning to designing and building a new home when weather warms up. Hopefully, if this is the case, you’ve done some homework and are working with someone already. If not, it’s time to get your thoughts in order and start the process.raising timber frame homes by bonnie pickartz

Below are a few tips for jump starting your journey to design and build your home.

  • Couples should sit down together and talk about the type, size, and style that you’d line to build…and your budget…come to an agreement on the budget.
  • Spend some time online and looking at books to get a feel for both the interior and exterior style that you find most appealing. Bookmark these photos or scan them in and save the images in a “new home” folder.
  • Make a list of the items that “must” be included and a list “wants”. Find a commonality for these lists and make this your starting place for design.
  • Define the space and how you’ll use it.
  • Contact two or three companies that communicate their services and homes well. The Internet is a great resource here. Visit websites and see how much information they share and how you relate to it.
  • Discuss their design and build process and find out how they work with their clients through this process.
  • Jump in with both feet. This process isn’t something that you should wade into with fear and trepidation, its a process that should be fun and exciting and something that you’ll look back on with a smile.

The Law of Timber Frame Home Design

Designing your new timber frame home is a journey of sorts. You’ll bring all the luggage you’ve gathered along the way. Homes you’ve seen on television shows, homes you’ve seen in magazines, homes you’ve driven past, homes you’ve lived in and visited…they’re all packed neatly away, waiting to be sorted and reviewed upon arrival at the design desk.

Interestingly enough, drawing timber frame house plans is not much different today than it was centuries ago. You decide how you live and you design your home to work around your lifestyle.

In 1852, American sculptor Horatio Greenough used the term “form follows function” as he was explaining the organic principles of architecture. Almost 50 years later, in 1896, architect Louis Sullivan wrote and article, “The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered” and expanded on the concept. He actually wrote “form ever follows function” a more emphatic phrase. He was adamant that this was the “rule that shall permit no exception”.  He wrote:

It is the pervading law of all things organic and inorganic,
Of all things physical and metaphysical,
Of all things human and all things super-human,
Of all true manifestations of the head,
Of the heart, of the soul,
That the life is recognizable in its expression,
That form ever follows function.
This is the law.

Today we need remember that rule and to keep function at the forefront as we design our timber frame homes. The way you live, the things that make you comfortable, the necessary space to live with ease…these are the first things to consider as you lay out your new timber frame home.

So take time to think about how you live as you begin designing your new timber frame home. And remember Mr. Sullivan’s words “form ever follows function”.  Let your life direct the design of your home and always Build Boldly.

 

Timber Frame Homes – Building Simpler, Smaller, Hybrid Homes

Timber Frame Homes should be the first option for everyone (in our humble opinion), but many see them as a more expensive option.  That doesn’t have to be the case. There are several paths to building more affordable timber frame homes.

  • Build Smaller – A smaller home doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice luxury or space.  It means you get rid of the excess area that you don’t use, don’t want to heat and cool, and don’t want to maintain.
  • Build Simpler – Corners cost.  This has been a construction truth for centuries. Looking back for centuries you’ll find simple, elegant structures that have few corners.  Complex roof lines increase the cost every step of the way.  Don’t give up style, work with textures (and timbers) to enhance your space inside and out. Change the ceiling heights to define space.  Don’t think you need lots of hips, valleys, and corners to build an amazing home.
  • Build Hybrid – Hybrid timber frame homes can be the perfect trade-0ff.  Fully timber frame the more public living spaces (great rooms, porches,etc) and use heavy timber rafters and trusses on walls built with structural insulated panels in the bedrooms, bathrooms, kitchens.  You save not only in the cost of the timber frame, but the space can be built out without working around posts and braces.  
As you design your new home, be sure to discuss these options with your team.  Making use of one or all of these options can be the difference in living in your dream home or settling for a stick-built home.   Designing and building your new home should be an adventure … a journey.  Making smart choices as you start will help you to build the timber frame home of your dreams … within your budget.
So, move forward, design and build your dream home, make wise choices, and live large!
And as you do this, remember to Build Boldly!  Visit with us to discuss designing and building your own dream home.
As always, I’m at your service.   Bonnie Pickartz
Goshen Timber Frame Hybrid HOme

Beautiful Timber Frame Videos

Sometimes you just have to step back and marvel at the beauty of a timber frame home.  When Neal and Pam started their timber frame journey, they had a vision….a vision of beautiful, elegant, rustic mountain homes that brought together strength and character of timber frames with the charm of the mountains of Western North Carolina.   To say that they succeeded would be an understatement.

The Pond and the Cottage are beautiful examples of timber frame homes.  They are both available for sale and for rent here in Franklin, North Carolina…just west of Asheville.

So today we’re sharing videos of these beautiful homes.  Walk through them and enjoy the beauty…it is certainly worth sharing.

Thank you for allowing us to share the beauty!

 

Timber Frame Homes – The Package

As you move forward in planning your timber frame home, you’ll likely look at timber frames from more than one company.  That’s the easy part.  Then you’ll begin to compare what you are purchasing from the company.

You’ll find that each company has a slightly (and sometimes drastically) different package.   And then you’ll find that many companies will sell a partial package and some companies will only work with you if they are providing all the items that their timber frame kit includes.

You should question what materials and services are included.  Some of the items that are necessary and may be included in your agreement with the timber frame company…or outsourced, either by you or by the company are:

Customer Service/Sales – You can work with a salesperson who will hand the project off to a designer at another location and the fabrication is handed off to yet another facility.  Or you can work with a company where the sales person is the customer service person and is the person who will be very hands on during the design, development, and completion of your home.   That person will have full responsibility for your new timber frame home, from soup to nuts.

Design – You’ll find some companies have designers on staff.  These designers can usually work with a plan from their portfolio, revising it as needed to make it work better for you, or they can custom design a home.    Other companies will work with a designer (either local or at a distance) or will send you to a designer or architect.  Email us for a look at a full set of builders plans that you can expect with a Goshen home.

Timber Frame – of course.

Decking – for the ceiling and loft, if called for in the design.

Insulated Panels – Panels can be used to wrap a timber frame or to be a structural part of a hybrid home.  What is the insulating material?  Polyurethane, expanded polystyrene, polyisocyanurate…and variations of these are most common.   Are the panels prefabricated?  Are they sheathed on both sides…or on one?  Do they have conduit and junction boxes built in (wherever you and your contractor/electrician specify) or do they just have chases for wiring?

Installation – Will the raising and panel installation be performed by their own crew, will they subcontract it, or will your contractor be responsible for this step?

Some companies have dealers/representatives who are contractors and you will purchase your package from them and they will complete the home.  While this may be an option for some, if you aren’t building where they are located, it may be problematic if they are subbing to a contractor who has never worked with timber frames and he/she is expected to raise and enclose your home. If you are working with a company who has no contractual ties to the contractor, you can be more selective in choosing your contractor and can make sure that they are a good fit for you…not just for the timber frame company.

Other companies will ship their package and you are own your own.  They will send a manual and your contractor will need to raise and enclose your home.

Some companies will send an experienced crew…the crew who has cut and/or pre-assembled your timber frame prior to delivery and who has installed insulated panels on their frames for years.

So..you can see that comparing apples to apples is not an easy thing to do.   On top of all these differences, you have to ask how they will communicate with you..telephone, online, mail, etc.

We definitely don’t want to discourage you, but we do want to encourage you to ask questions and consider your options.  At Goshen Timber Frames, we’ve created our entire process to be client-centric and to be flexible enough to allow for individual decisions.    While our three favorite words are plan, plan, plan, we also live by “the buck stops here”.

You can visit our new  FAQs  page for an overview of what a Goshen Timber Frames’ package includes.  And you can always give us a call at 828-524-8662 or drop me an bonnie@goshenframes.com, too.  We’re here to help.