Balanced Ventilation in a Timber Frame Home

 

For nearly 20 years, Goshen has encouraged clients to incorporate a balanced ventilation system into their heating and cooling units. Whether an energy recovery ventilator or a heat recovery ventilator, depending on the climate where you build, the balanced ventilation system is an important part of your H VAC system.

A balanced ventilation system replaces the exhaust/supply system by supplying  fresh air to bedrooms and living rooms, the most lived in areas, and exhausts air from rooms with more moisture and pollutants (kitchen, bathrooms, laundry rooms). The balanced ventilation system is important to a healthy house.  

We’ve often suggested that balanced ventilation systems will be required by code and from what we are seeing, this will happen sooner rather than later. Homes are tighter and stale air is a health hazard.  It’s time for these systems to be more widely utilized.

There are basic balanced ventilation systems and more specialized energy recovery ventilators and heat recovery ventilators. You should work with your local heating and cooling contractor to determine the best unit for your climate and your home.

And, wherever and whatever you build, as always, we encourage you to Build Boldly.

Visit us at Goshen Timber Frames for more information or drop us a note at info@goshenframes.com if you have any questions or at newsletter@timberframemag.com if you’d like to get our new plans and not-too-frequent newsletters.

Bonnie Pickartz

 

Resources:

Popular Mechanics – How it works.

Energy.gov – Whole house ventilation

 

4 Questions to Answer in Planning Timber Frame Homes

Planning green timber frame homes is, if anything, easier than planning to build a conventional home.  Timber frames and structural insulated panels take the project well into “green” territory before any other decision is made. Using minimally processed materials (heavy timbers) and an unsurpassed enclosure systems makes green building less stressful.

As you do plan your new timber frame home, you’ll need to consider if you want to build as green as possible, whether to seek green building certification, and where to concentrate your efforts. The possibilities are endless, as are the questions and the answers. If you consider these questions early on, you’ll have a big picture understanding and can make other decisions based on these answers.  Timber frame homes allow you to answer “yes” to these questions.

Energy efficiency,  durability, and renewability are key to evaluating any building system. And buildings are a system and should be planned as such. The answers will help you to determine your path to having a home that will serve you and generations well. Answering these questions for each component will give you the “greenest” home, but answering them for the timber frame package takes you a long way toward an energy efficient, sustainable home.colmar timber frame homes

  1. Does it have a long life? Timber frame homes that were built over a thousand years ago are in place and living well today.
  2. Does it save energy? Timber frames, enclosed in insulated panels are hard to beat. The reduced consumption of energy is good for your pocket and for the earth.
  3. Does it minimize contributions to the waste stream? Timbers are minimally processed. Panels are built offsite, minimizing site waste.
  4. Is it renewable and recyclable? Many timbers are grown as a crop. They are a naturally renewable resource and can easily be recycled. Today many barns built hundreds of years ago are being repurposed as homes, flooring, and other building materials.

Plan carefully, considering your site and how to best place your home, the size of your home (don’t over or under build), the materials you use to finish your home. Each step brings more questions, but these four questions will help you to gauge the sustainability of the materials your using.

And when you build, build for generations and…build boldly!

 

 

Energy Costs in Timber Frame Homes

Energy costs in timber frame homes has always been one of the items we bring to the table when we discuss the advantages of timber frames.  The cost to heat and cool a home that’s wrapped in structural insulated panels is typically low.   As we designed our home, we wanted plenty of natural light, but understand all too well that windows are the least efficient wall space.  However, our utility bills continue to please us.

We heat and cool our house with electricity.  Propane to cook and for the tankless water heater runs less than $100 a year.  In the past twelve months, our electricity has cost less than $886. While we watch our usage, we comfortable and don’t live in a dark, cold home.  Even with an abundance of windows, our costs average $2.41 per day for electricity.  Timber frame homes offer these economies naturally.Bonnie Pickartz Electric Costs in Timber Frame Homes

As we discuss designing homes with our clients, we consider daylighting, air flow, and overhangs to be an important part of the design process.  Homes shouldn’t only be beautiful, they should be comfortable and efficient.  We bring this altogether in the final design.

Energy costs will continue to rise, so it is always important to consider ways to make homes more efficient. This alone will minimize the money spent in the future to heat and cool a home.  Adding a well insulated envelope to the items on your wish list in your new home is the most effective way to save money long term.  Today we can’t stress the importance of this too much.  Save money…daily.

So, consider your options, and when you build…build boldly!

BonniePickartzSnow

 

 

Energy Efficiency in Timber Frame Homes

Timber frame homes are beautiful, inspiring, charming, and all of the wonderful words that you can consider.  And, when properly designed and constructed, they are also amazingly energy efficient. This doesn’t happen by accident, but with intentional design and construction.

Designing for not only beauty, but also for energy efficiency, should be goals from the start.  You will need to consider size, style, orientation, daylighting, and all the other subtle ways that you can plan forward.  Make it known early in your design meetings that you want your home to be sustainable and to minimize energy usage.

Plan forward for energy efficient fixtures and appliances and to use energy efficient bulbs.  Don’t save money with inefficient appliances and windows.  They will cost you daily.

Structural Insulated Panels are the enclosure of choice for many timber frame companies.  Timber frame homes  and hybrid homes work well with panel systems. A tight home and a well insulated home don’t necessarily go hand in hand, but a well installed panel system covers it all.

We not only promote energy efficiency, but we live it.  Our own 1700 square foot timber frame home, with lots of windows and vaulted ceilings, uses only $2.34 per day ($835 for the year) in electricity.  We heat and cool with a heat pump and don’t have a fireplace or any auxiliary heat source.  We have an electric dryer and a dishwasher.

Last year our energy usage was $3.08 per day ($1,123 for the year).  We had a much colder winter, but we also made some common sense changes.   We don’t run the dishwasher until it’s full.  We hang some clothes out to dry.  Simple choices have saved us almost $300 per year.

So think forward.  Plan your home to save those energy dollars and to be comfortable.  Build a home you’ll love and whatever you do, Build Boldly!