Green Building Notes – Your Timber Frame Journey Begins

One of the first things you should do as you begin your design/build process is make a decision as to whether you will build a “green certified” home. If you decide to do this later in the process, you may have to take steps backwards and redo some things in the construction process. Certification is widely believed to add value, so if you are going to sell the home, this may be a wise option. It also requires oversight and a decision about the class of certification you wish to achieve. As the trend to build homes to meet higher green standards moves forward, certification may or may not have a large impact on the economic value of the home. What will continue to be important is the quality of the home and the measures taken to ensure that the home is built to the highest standards.

We’ve included a checklist of issues that should be addressed in the green design/build process whether you choose to have your home certified or not. Also included is a comparison of the two most common green building standards. Both LEED and NAHB Green Building certifications require builders who are registered within the programs. You must determine which, if either, certification you are seeking early in your design/build process. They both offer extensive documentation. Nationwide there are local and regional certifications that offer similar certifications. They also provide documentation and lists of inspectors who can help you meet their requirements.

Our goal is to provide a list of best practices for building your new Goshen home that are important whether or not you decide to build a green certified home. The Goshen Timber Frames Guidelines are meant to provide a direction and to help you as you wade through the seemingly overwhelming “green building” books, articles, and websites. These guidelines are not meant to meet requirements for any certification program. They will help you to build a green home.

Once you have selected the items on which you will focus and include in your building process, documentation is important. Copies of invoices and inspections, photos, drawings, and any notes you make should be logged faithfully. Start a notebook and be diligent in your documentation.

The location of your new home will be the first step in building your green home. The value of your green home begins with the land on which it sits. Careful site evaluation early in the project will guide your design process in the right direction.

* Will you be building in a rural or an urban area?
* Will your site require extensive site development?
* Will your site allow for your home to be situated for active or passive solar energy or for daylighting?
* Will local or subdivision building requirements allow you to build a home in the size/style you wish?
* Are there important natural features that need to be preserved.

Site the home to minimize the impact on the land. By keeping roads and utility access short you less your impact on the land and save money. Try your best to utilize previously used or degraded areas for the building, parking, and roads.

More local building departments are requiring onsite water management. Working to make sure that stormwater is managed, preventing runoff that will carry topsoil away and will pollute streams, and using a resevoir system to capture rainwater to use for irrigation are all ways to be a responsible landholder.

Protect trees during construction. Fence the trees at the drip line to avoid construction traffic and debris.

Landscaping will play an important part in the energy efficiency of your new home. Trees to protect the home from the glaring sun will significantly reduce cooling costs.

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